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back to Health & Fitness

Exercise and Muscle Soreness
by Dr. Jeremy Sims

Muscle soreness is one of the most common complaints on starting any new exercise program. This is the particularly the case if you are using groups of muscles which have previously been inactive.  Generally two types of soreness may be experienced:

Acute onset
Occurs during or immediately after exercise and will gradually fade over the following 3 or 4 hours. It results from inadequate blood flow to the affected muscles. There are no long-term consequences, however, if it occurs during an exercise routine then you should rest and allow your muscles to recuperate before continuing .

Delayed onset
Soreness becomes evident 2 to 3 days post-exercise and can last up to a week. It results from minute tears in muscle fibers and is a sign that you are attempting too much too soon. Always gradually increase the intensity of your exercise over a period of time to prevent delayed onset soreness.  Carrying out any form of exercise incorrectly can be dangerous.  Always ensure you have a fully qualified instructor available to advise you.
  If muscle soreness persists for more than a week, ensure that you seek medical advice straightaway.
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HealthChat 2000
Dr. Sims is the Medical Director of FitStop, the UK's foremost group of health and fitness centers, and an expert on matters relating to fitness of body and mind. Having trained as a GP, he now works full-time in health promotion and has written extensively on the subject, including a monthly medical column in Mensa magazine with the TV psychiatrist, Dr Raj Persaud. Dr. Sims was the original Virgin.Net online doctor. Article courtesy of MediaPeak, http://mediapeak.com

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